Avonmore

Place Name: Avonmore

Feature Type (Year Approved): Neighbourhood (1954), Park (1967)

Name Origins: Commemorative, Royal

Definition: 

Ireland. Counties Cork, Sligo, and Wicklow. 'The big river'.

From: Oxford Dictionary of British Place Names

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

Algernon William Yelverton, Viscount Avonmore was an Irish peer and adventurer who stopped in Edmonton en route to his 1897 expedition to the Klondike Gold Rush. During the mid-1950s, parts of Avonmore were also called the Avonmore Addition.

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Austin O'Brien Road

Place Name: Austin O'Brien Road

Feature Type (Year Approved): Road (1959)

Name Origins: Commemorative

Definition: 

Irish: from Ó Briain ‘descendant of Brian’, an ancient Celtic personal name probably based on bre- ‘hill’, in the transferred sense ‘eminence’, i.e. ‘exalted one’.

From: Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

Austin O'Brien (1896-1972) was superintendent of the separate school board for 37 years. He was born in Prince Edward Island and taught there and in Alberta before being named superintendent in 1924. He retired in 1961.

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Athlone

Place Name: Athlone

Feature Type (Year Approved): Neighbourhood (1956) Park (1982)

Name Origins: Commemorative, Royal 

Definition: 

Westmeath (A country in Ireland). 'Town of Luan's ford'. 

From: Oxford Dictionary of British Place Names.

Athlone (/æθˈloʊn/; Irish: Baile Átha Luain, meaning "town of Luan's ford")[2] is a town on the River Shannon near the southern shore of Lough Ree in Ireland. It is the second most populous town in the Midlands Region with a population of 21,349 in the 2016 census,[3] and is considered the commercial capital of the Midlands.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athlone

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

The Earl of Athlone, also known as Sir Alexander Augustus Frederick William Alfred George Cambridge, Prince Alexander of Teck (1874-1957), served as governor general of Canada from 1940 to 1946. He was the brother of Queen Mary, great-uncle of Queen Elizabeth II, and was married to Princess Alice, grand-daughter of Queen Victoria. The Athlone neighbourhood is part of a large parcel of land that was annexed to Edmonton in 1913. Most of the neighbourhood's development occurred a decade after the Earl's residency in Canada. This neighbourhood includes the former Dunvegan area.

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Arthur Elliott Park

Place Name: Arthur Elliot Park

Feature Type (Year Approved): Park (1988)

Name Origins: Commemorative

Definition: 

Elliot. English: relationship name from the Middle English, Old French personal name Eliot, a pet form of the Old Testament name Elijah, rendered in Greek as Elias, and in Old French as Élie, + the diminutive suffix -ot.

From: Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

This 1.46-ha. park, located in the West Jasper Place neighbourhood, was named in honour of Arthur Harold Elliott (1881-1966). Elliott was born in Washington State and came to Alberta in 1905. He served on the Jasper Place town council in 1951 and 1952, and held the post of town welfare officer for six years.

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Armstrong Industrial

Place Name: Armstrong Industrial

Feature Type (Year Approved): Neighbourhood (1975)

Name Origins: Commemorative

Definition: 

Scottish, English: nickname from Middle English arm + strang, i.e. ‘strong in the arm’.

From: Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

This neighbourhood is named in recognition of the contributions of businessman and politician George S. Armstrong (1867-1947). Born in Ontario, he came to Edmonton in 1905, where he established a drugstore. Armstrong served as an alderman from 1908 to 1910, mayor of Edmonton from 1911 to 1912 and was appointed Edmonton's postmaster in 1913.

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Argyll

Place Name: Argyll

Feature Type (Year Approved): Neighbourhood (1954), Road (1956), Park (1967)

Name Origins: Commemorative, Royal

Definition: 

English: nickname from Middle English *erguil(e), a variant of Middle English orguil(e), Old French orguel ‘pride, arrogance’.

No evidence has been found to support the idea that this is a locative surname from Argyll, the county of southwestern Scotland, though folk etymology to this effect may be partly responsible for the modern spelling of the surname.

From: Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

This land was subdivided in 1912, just prior to annexation by the City of Edmonton in 1913. The land remained largely undeveloped until the 1950s, when it was replotted. Originally called Edmonton City Heights, the neighbourhood was renamed Argyll in honour of Sir John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, the ninth Duke of Argyll and Marquess of Lorne. He was the husband of Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, after whom Alberta was named. The Marquess was governor general of Canada from 1878 to 1883, and founded the Royal Society of Canada in 1882 and the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, a precursor to the National Gallery, in 1880. In 1881, he was the first vice-regal to tour western Canada.

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Anthony Henday Drive

Place Name: Anthony Henday Drive

Feature Type (Year Approved): Road (1988)

Name Origins: Commemorative

Definition: 

'Henday' is not listed in the Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland.

Anthony Henday (fl. 1750–1762) was one of the first European men to explore the interior of the Canadian northwest.

Henday was from the Isle of Wight, he may have been baptised in Shorwell on 24 December 1725.

His explorations were authorized and funded by the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) because of their concern with La Vérendrye and the other western commanders who were funnelling fur trade from the northwest to their forts. Eventually, James Isham, chief at York Fort, suggested someone go to western Rupert's Land to encourage trade with the region's First Nations tribes.

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Henday

Cultural Affiliation: British (English)

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

Anthony Henday, and English-born fur trader with the Hudson's Bay Company, is believed to have been the first person of European descent to make contact with Aboriginal people in today's southern Alberta. Henday, with a party of Cree guides, travelled west from York factory by canoe and foot in 1754-55, reaching the prairies in the fall of 1754. In the spring of 1755 he camped along the North Saskatchewan River, where he met with people from the Cree and Blackfoot nations. Whether or not he was also the first to see the majestic, snow-capped Rocky Mountains, however, remains a matter of dispute. While four copies of Henday's original journal exist, they are contradictory and the identification of quoted place names with con temporary geography has proven problematic.

Employed as a labourer for the Hudson's Bay Company at York Factory, in what is now Manitoba, Henday volunteered to travel west as part of the company's program of expanding its contact with Aboriginal trading partners. Just south of present day Red Deer, Henday met with the chief of the "Archithinue" people (believed to be Blackfoot). He failed, however, to convince the chief of the benefits of trading with the Hudson's Bay Company and returned to York Factory. A second trip west, in 1759, was also unsuccessful. Henday left the Hudson's Bay Company in 1762 and is believed to have returned to England.

Anthony Henday Drive forms a portion of a staged, long-term roadway plan that has been part of Edmonton's and Alberta's transportation network for more than 30 years. It is also an important link in the provincial north-south trade corridor. The ongoing project [since completed] will extend Anthony Henday Drive from Yellowhead Trail in northwest Edmonton to Calgary Trail in the south. The project's western segment, Yellowhead Trail south to 45 Avenue and connecting to Whitemud Drive, was completed in 2001. The easter segment, to follow former Highways 14 and 14X, is in the preliminary design phase. The southwest segment, to Highway 2 in the south, is scheduled for completion in 2005 and will complete the bypass of the city.

[Read more about Anthony Henday Drive on Wikipedia

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Edmonton

Place name: Edmonton

Name Origins: Commemorative

Feature Type (Year Approved): City (1795)

Definition: Greater London, 1086. "Farmstead of a man called Ēadhelm". Source: A Dictionary of British Place Names, 2011.

"Edmonton was first recorded in Domesday Book, as ‘Adelmetone’, which had been a farmstead belonging to a man named Ēadhelm. At this time it was the smallest of the hundreds (administrative areas) of Middlesex, but nevertheless encompassed Enfield, Tottenham and South Mimms. Woodland covered much of the district and pig-keeping was the main form of agriculture." Source: Hidden London

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

Naming Edmonton, From Ada to Zoie contains a feature story 'Edmonton' on pp. 87. That story is reproduced in full below:

Edmonton is one of the oldest areas of "European" settlement in what is now the province of Alberta. Fort Edmonton was established in 1795 as a fur trade post of the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC). It was built as part of the HBC's western expansion during its competition for trade and influence with the rival firm, the North West Company (NWC). For Edmonton was named for the English birthplace of Sir James Winter Lake. He was present at the meeting of the governors of the HBC when it was decided to establish a fort on the North Saskatchewan River.

The first Fort Edmonton was built some 32 kilometres further down the North Saskatchewan from the current city, across the river from present-day Fort Saskatchewan [note: according to the Saskatchewan entry in Naming Edmonton (pp. 231) Saskatchewan is derived from a Cree word, kis-is-ska-tche-wan*, meaning 'swift current']. For mutual protection, it was built in close proximity to the NWC's post, Fort Augustus, constructed earlier that same year. For a number of reasons, including the lack of readily available firewood and threats by local Aboriginal groups, both companies abandoned this site in 1801 and moved to what is now Rossdale, in downtown Edmonton. They stayed at this site for nine years and then, in 1810, moved to a spot at the confluence of the North Saskatchewan River and White Earth Creek, about 15 kilometres east of the town of Smokey Lake, northeast of present day Edmonton. A number of forts, including NWC's Fort Augustus and the HBC's Fort Edmonton were relocated to this site. The forts shared the same stockade and were known as the Lower Terre Blanche Houses [French: White Earth House].

Another move occurred in the winter of 1813 - 1814, when this location was abandoned in favour of the site where the Rossdale Power House [Edmonton Maps Heritage notes that the site of Fort Edmonton is an First Nations burial site] now is situated. The third Forts Edmonton and Augustus became Fort Edmonton after 1821, when the two companies merged under the HBC banner. Following the flood in 1825, Chief Factor John Rowland decided to rebuild further above the flats. In 1830, the fortified trading post was located just below the present-day Provence of Alberta's Legislature Buildings in Edmonton. The last buildings of this fort were demolished in 1915.

With the influx of settlers in the late 1800's, and its historical significance as a "gateway to the north", Edmonton prospered. In 1892 it was officially made a town and in October 1904 it was given the status of a city. Because of its geographically central location and its political influence and connections, in 1906 Edmonton became the capital of the newly created province of Alberta.

The name "Edmonton" is derived from the Ango-Saxon Christian name Ēadhelm and "tun" or "ton", which means "field" of "enclosure".

*The Cree Syllabics are ᑭᓯᐢᑳᒋᐊᐧᓂ ᓰᐱ and the transliteration is kisiskâciwani-sîpiy.

Source: On-line Cree Dictionary

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Alex Tayler Road

Place Name: Alex Taylor Road

Feature Type (Year Approved): Road (1958)

Name Origins: Commemorative

Definition: 

English: occupational name from Anglo-Norman French, Middle English taillour ‘tailor’ (Old French tailleor, tailleur).

From: Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Cultural Affiliation: British

Gender: Male

Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie

A school and a road are named in honour of Alex Taylor (1854-1916), the founder of many of Edmonton's earliest institutions. He was a pioneer newspaperman and businessman who, among many other enterprises, owned the city's first telephone company. Alex Taylor School (built in 1908) is located immediately west of Alex Taylor road.

In 1879 Taylor came west from Ottawa to take the position of telegraph operator at Hay Lakes, more than 30 kilometres east of Fort Edmonton. This was the closest station to the fort at the time. By 1880, Taylor and other local entrepreneurs had extended the line to John Walter's property, located directly across the North Saskatchewan River from the fort. Over this line, he took down news bulletins that went into the Edmonton Bulletin, the city's first newspaper, which Taylor founded with Frank Oliver in 1881.

In 1884 he brought the first telephone to Edmonton and, on November 1, 1887, made the first long distance call, to Battleford, 480 kilometres away. Within a year, there were twelve telephones in Edmonton, all made possible by Taylor's early telephone company later incorporated as The Edmonton District Telephone Company. Taylor was a majority stockholder in the Edmonton Electric Light Company, established in 1891, the post master from 1893 to 1896, and from 1886 to 1909, Taylor was also chairman of the Edmonton School Board.

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